GRAB BAG - rocks and minerals in Canada
Excellent tool to learn about Canadian geology

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Crystal Ray Technologies Inc.


Picture

Picture
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Glowing rocks
We offer very rare minerals
That glow when exposed
to certain Ultra-Violet Light.

This one is one of our own local

discoveries. We call it GatNGlo!


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Canadian Geology Kits
    Regions: Ontario, Quebec:
  • Small Kits, 7" by 4" by 1"

    with some 15 samples at: $25

  • Large Kits, 8.25" by 4.75" by 1.25"

    with some 18 samples at: $35



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The Feldspar Family!!

The Mica Family!!

The Sulphur Family!!

The Quartz Family!!

Rose Quartz
Rose Quartz

Rose quartz is a type of quartz which exhibits a pale pink to rose red hue. The color is due to the inclusion of dumortierite, in the quartz crystal. Since these inclusions are constrained by the crystalographic system (hexagoanl) when light reflects off of a dome of it it seems to reflect a star (asterism). This can actually be observed by shing a laser pointer through a stone and allowing the projected light to appear on the wall to view the star!, in transmitted light.
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Smoky Quartz
Rose Quartz

Smoky quartz or smokey quartz is a brown to black variety of quartz caused through the natural (or artificial) radiation from radioactive decay occuring near by the quartz crystal.
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Amethyst Quartz
Rose Quartz

Amethyst is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewelry. The name comes from the Ancient Greek ἀ a- ("not") and μέθυστος methustos ("intoxicated"), a reference to the belief that the stone protected its owner from drunkenness; the ancient Greeks and Romans wore amethyst and made drinking vessels of it in the belief that it would prevent intoxication, unfortunately it really did not help them much. the color is from inclusions of iron Ferric (Fe3). It indiscates the tenperature durring formation sometimes the iron runs out or the temperature lowers for a while and then you get areas within the crystal that are with out color. That is called a zoned crystals, it almost looks like tree rings.
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Agate
Rose Quartz

Agate (pronounced /ˈæɡət/) is a micro-crystalline variety of quartz (silica), chiefly chalcedony, characterised by its fineness of grain and brightness of color. Agates can occur anywhere there is warm water, silica and a hole for it to evaporate from.
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Flint
Rose Quartz

Flint (or flintstone) is a hard, sedimentary cryptocrystalline form of the mineral quartz, categorized as a variety of chert. It occurs chiefly as nodules and masses in sedimentary rocks, such as chalks and limestones. Inside the nodule, flint is usually dark grey, black, green, white, or brown in color, and often has a glassy or waxy appearance. Out flint come from the Niagra enscarpment and is what is responcible for resiting the erosive force of the niagra river, thus making the beautiful water falls for us to see!


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Perthite
Rose Quartz

Perthite is named after perth Ontario! to describe an intergrowth of two feldspars: a host grain of potassium-rich alkali feldspar includes exsolved lamellae or irregular intergrowths of sodic alkali feldspar (near albite in composition).
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Spectralite (Labradorite)
Rose Quartz

Spectrolite is a rare variety of labradorite feldspar which exhibits intense labradorescence, schiller or iridescence. The variety is a trade name for material mined in Finland. Labradorite with the spectrolite play of colors has also reported from Madagascar. It is noted for the play of colors from blue to red. It is often cut as a lapidary cabochon and used as a gemstone.
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Amazonite
Rose Quartz

Amazonite is a microcline fledspar that has ingested either some lead or copper that has turned it green! it is used primarily as a decoritive stone and terazo flooring. It occurs in under ground melts of molten rock that are allowed to cool slowly. which allows the minerals to grow into large crystals called pegmatites. It is often associated with cleavelandite, quartz, black tourmaline and beryl, just like in our local here in Quadville, Ontario or Lac St. Jean Quebec. High-quality crystals have been obtained from Pike's Peak, Colorado.


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Graphic Granite
Rose Quartz

Granite (pronounced /ˈɡrænɨt/) is a common and widely occurring type of intrusive, felsic, igneous rock. Granites usually have a medium to coarse grained texture. Occasionally some individual crystals (phenocrysts) are larger than the groundmass in which case the texture is known as porphyritic.
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Plagioclase (in Anorthosite)
Rose Quartz

Plagioclase is an important series of tectosilicate minerals within the feldspar family. It represents the calsium rich end memeber of the triangular chemical family of feldspar. It is the feldspar that produces labradorite. Anorthite was named by Rose in 1823 from the Greek meaning oblique, referring to its triclinic crystallization. Anorthite is a comparatively rare mineral but occurs in the basic plutonic rocks of some orogenic calc-alkaline suites.
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Sodalite
Rose Quartz

Sodalite is a rich royal blue mineral widely enjoyed as an ornamental gemstone. Although many common sodalite are opaque, some gem quality pieces and crystals are can be transparent to translucent. Sodalite is a member of the sodalite group and—together with hauyne, nosean, and lazurite—is a common constituent of lapis lazuli.
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Sodalite - hackmanite
Rose Quartz

Hackmanite is an important variety of sodalite it has the unique ability to change color when exposed to UV light, like that in a sunny day (tenebrescence). When hackmanite from Mont Saint-Hilaire (Quebec) or Ilímaussaq (Greenland) is freshly quarried, it is generally pale to deep violet but the colour fades quickly to greyish or greenish white, then put it in the sun light and the color comes right back! It is this very feature that makes it one of the center pieces of our research here.
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Hematite
Rose Quartz

Hematite is a mineral, colored black to steel or silver-gray, brown to reddish brown, or red. dispite it color it will always leave a red streak when rub against a piece of floor tile. It is frequently mined as an ore of iron with the only by product being oxygen which we breath. Which is also a major importance in making red blood in our bodies carry oxygen for us to live! Varieties include kidney ore, martite (pseudomorphs after magnetite), iron rose and specularite (specular hematite). While the forms of hematite vary, they all have a rust-red streak. Hematite is harder than pure iron, but much more brittle.
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Biotite Mica
Rose Quartz

Biotite is a sheet silicate. Iron, magnesium, aluminium, silicon, oxygen, and hydrogen form sheets that are weakly bond together by potassium ions. It is sometimes called "iron mica" because it is more iron-rich than phlogopite. It is also sometimes called "black mica" as opposed to "white mica" (muscovite) – both form in some rocks, in some instances side-by-side. Due to its darkness and metal content many times biotite is ignored durring most mining processes. It is named after the famous early French scientist Miseur Biote
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Mica
Rose Quartz

The mica group of sheet silicate (phyllosilicate) minerals includes several closely related materials having highly perfect basal cleavage. All are monoclinic with a tendency towards pseudo-hexagonal crystals and are similar in chemical composition. The highly perfect cleavage, which is the most prominent characteristic of mica, is explained by the hexagonal sheet-like arrangement of its atoms.
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Red Mica Schist
Rose Quartz

The schists form a group of medium-grade metamorphic rocks, chiefly notable for the preponderance of lamellar minerals such as micas, chlorite, talc, hornblende, graphite, and others. Quartz often occurs in drawn-out grains to such an extent that a particular form called quartz schist is produced.
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Red Mica Adventurine
Rose Quartz

Aventurine is a soft green semi-translucent to mostly opaque stone with mica flecks. Aventurine also comes in silvery, yellow, reddish brown, greenish-brown, bluish green and orange. It contains inclusions of small crystals that reflect light and give a range of colors - depending on the nature of the inclusion.
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Fuschite
Rose Quartz

Is a chromium colored green muscovite that is an indicator of the posible presence of gold.
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Gypsum
Rose Quartz

Gypsum is a common mineral, with thick and extensive evaporite beds in association with sedimentary rocks. Deposits are known to occur in strata from as early as the Permian age. It is often associated with the minerals halite and sulfur. It is the primiary consituent of sheet rock that is used to make our homes! and walls.


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Serpentine
Rose Quartz

The serpentine group describes a group of common rock-forming hydrous magnesium iron phyllosilicate minerals; they may contain minor amounts of other elements including chromium, manganese, cobalt and nickel. In mineralogy and gemology, serpentine may refer to any of 20 varieties belonging to the serpentine group. Owing to admixture, these varieties are not always easy to individualize, and distinctions are not usually made.
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Pyrite
Rose Quartz

The mineral pyrite, or iron pyrite, is an iron sulfide with the formula FeS2. This mineral's metallic lustre and pale-to-normal, brass-yellow hue have earned it the nickname fool's gold because of its resemblance to gold. The color has also led to the nicknames brass, brazzle and Brazil, primarily used to refer to pyrite found in coal.
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Galena
Rose Quartz

Galena is the natural mineral form of lead sulfide. It is the most important lead ore mineral. Galena is one of the most abundant and widely distributed sulfide minerals. It crystallizes in the cubic crystal system often showing octahedral forms. It is often associated with the minerals sphalerite, calcite and fluorite.
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Riebeckite
Rose Quartz

Riebeckite is a sodium-rich member of the amphibole group of silicate minerals. It forms a series with magnesioriebeckite. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system, usually as long prismatic crystals showing a diamond-shaped cross section, but also in fibrous, bladed, acicular, columnar, and radiating forms. Its Mohs hardness is 5.0–6.0, and its specific gravity is 3.0–3.4.
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Garnet
Rose Quartz

The garnet group includes a group of minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives. The name "garnet" may come from either the Middle English word gernet meaning 'dark red', or the Latin granatus ("grain"), possibly a reference to the Punica granatum ("pomegranate"), a plant with red seeds similar in shape, size, and color to some garnet crystals.
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Pinite
Rose Quartz

Fine-grained pseudomorphs after silicate minerals, especially cordierite, nepheline and scapolite. MIneralogically, "pinite" is primarily composed of mica (usually muscovite) and clay group minerals. First reported from Pini adit, Aue, Erzgebirge, Saxony, Germany.
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Silver Ore
Rose Quartz

Silver is a metallic chemical element with the chemical symbol Ag (Latin: argentum, from the Indo-European root *arg- for "white" or "shining") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it has the highest electrical conductivity of any element and the highest thermal conductivity of any metal.
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